(NW) Eurostat: Threefold Difference Between Price Levels in Bulgaria and Denmark

June 19 (BTA) – According to a Eurostat publication on Friday, price levels for consumer goods and services differed widely in the European Union. Denmark (141 per cent of the EU average) had the highest price level, followed by Ireland (134per cent), Luxembourg (131 per cent), Finland (127 per cent) and Sweden (121 per cent). At the opposite end of the scale, the lowest price levels were found in Bulgaria (53 per cent) and Romania ( 55 per cent). In other words, price levels for consumer goods and services in the EU varied by almost one to three between the cheapest and the most expensive Member State. In 2019, the price level of food and non-alcoholic beverages across the EU was almost twice as high in the most expensive Member State as in the cheapest one. Price levels ranged from 66 per cent of the EU average in Romania and 70 per cent in Poland, to 129 per cent of the average in Denmark, followed by Luxembourg and Austria (both 124per cent). The lowest price level for alcoholic beverages and tobacco in 2019 was registered in Bulgaria (62 per cent of the average), ahead of Poland (74 per cent), Hungary and Romania (both 75 per cent). At the opposite end of the scale, the highest prices were observed in Ireland (188 per cent), followed at a distance by Finland (157 per cent) and Sweden (131 per cent). Restaurants and hotels were more than 3 times more expensive in Denmark than in Bulgaria. Price levels ranged from 45 per cent in Bulgaria and 54 per cent Romania to 156 per cent in Denmark. Smaller disparities were registered for consumer electronics, personal transport equipment and clothes. Consumer electronics is a group of products where prices differed less among Member States, ranging from 91 per cent of the average in Poland and 92 per cent in Bulgaria to 111 per cent in France. Clothing was cheapest in Bulgaria (79 per cent of the average) and most expensive in Denmark (132 per cent). Price differences among Member States were also limited for personal transport equipment, from 82 per cent in Slovakia to 87 per cent in Bulgaria, to 138 per cent in Denmark. RI/MT /МТ/